Emily Schwing

FM News Reporter

Emily Schwing started stuffing envelopes for KUER FM90 in Salt Lake City.  It was meant to be volunteer position, but it turned into a multi-year summer internship.  After developing her own radio show for Carleton College's KRLX, Emily was hooked.  She moved on to an internship with 'Radio Expeditions' at National Public Radio in Washington, DC in 2006.  She’s also worked for Deutsche Welle Radio in Bonn, Germany.  Emily has also filed stories for NPR, APM, CBC, Monocle Radio and National Native News.   Emily grew up between Denver, CO, Pittsburgh, PA and Salt Lake City, UT.  She's lived in Homer, Sitka and Petersburg but now calls Fairbanks home. She earned her BA in Geology and Environmental Studies from Carleton College in Minnesota, and is completing her MS in Natural Resources Management at UAF. In the winter, Emily is KUAC's "Mushing Correspondent," following all 1000 miles of the Yukon Quest International Sled Dog Race

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Sports
9:16 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Inaugural Beringia Arctic Games Brings Indigenous People Together in Russia

The residents of Novoye Chaplino greeted vistors when they arrived on the beach with traditional song and dance.
Emily Schwing KUAC

Novoye Chaplino - This time of year, indigenous people across the Far North gather to play games and celebrate traditions. Earlier this month, in Fairbanks the took part in the World Eskimo Indian Olympics. There was also a gathering of people from across the Circumpolar north in Inuvik, Canada. This year, native people from Arctic nations joined Russia’s Chukchi and Inuit peoples for the first ever Beringia Arctic Games. It was the largest gathering of it’s kind in a once forgotten corner of the world called Chukotka.

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Science
12:17 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Scientists Find Climate Cooling Effect in Ancient Thermokarst Lakes

Fairbanks, AK  - Scientists have long believed melting permafrost emits large amounts of carbon-rich greenhouse gases like methane and carbon dioxide to the atmosphere resulting in a warming climate.  But a new study published online by the journal Nature indicates ancient lakes that formed after permafrost fin the Arctic first melted roughly ten thousand years ago may in fact have a net climate cooling effect over long time scales.  The the study also increases the total amount of carbon estimated in the frozen soils of the Far North by more than 50 percent.

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KUAC Newscasts
10:36 am
Tue July 15, 2014

Newscast: Tuesday 7/15/14

KUAC Newscasts
11:00 am
Mon July 14, 2014

Newscast: Monday 7/14/14

Wildlife
6:00 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Study Shows Single Wolf Death Can Impact Entire Pack

Credit Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Fairbanks, AK - A new study indicates that the death of a wolf has implications for the rest of the pack, depending on the size of the pack and the dead wolf's sex. The study is in response to the legal trapping of a breeding female that was part of a well known wolf pack that was frequently spotted in the Denali National Park.
 

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Wildlife
6:00 am
Wed July 9, 2014

"Among Wolves" Details Researcher's Lifelong Passion

Credit http://www.amazon.com/Among-Wolves-Insights-Alaskas-Misunderstood/dp/1602232180

Fairbanks, AK - The University of Alaska Press recently published a book detailing one biologist’s lifelong effort to chronicle the lives of wolves that live inside the boundary of Denali Park and Preserve.

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Yukon Quest
6:00 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Big Rule Change Comes to the Yukon Quest

Brent Sass's lead dogs lick the ice from their booties during a quick stop for supplies at Carmacks during the 2014 Yukon Quest.
Credit Emily Schwing / KUAC

Fairbanks, AK - The Yukon Quest International Sled Dog Race will have a new set of rules in 2015.  Overall rest time has been decreased by two hours, but mushers will be required to make more mandatory stops along the 1000 mile trail.

Driving a dog team between Fairbanks and Whitehorse used to take 12 days or more, but in the last few years the fastest sled dogs have completed the run in just over nine days.  Eureka musher Brent Sass says the addition of more mandatory stops fundamentally alters the race. “It’s huge. It’s huge.  It’s a huge change!” he exclaims.

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Local News
6:00 am
Thu June 19, 2014

Army Changes Training Procedures In Wake Of Stuart Creek 2 Fire

Smoke above the Stuart Creek 2 Fire in 2013.
Credit Alaska Fire Service

Fairbanks, AK - It’s been one year since the Stuart Creek 2 Wildfire was reported burning in the Yukon Training area northeast of Fairbanks.  The blaze, ignited during an army artillery training exercise, burned more than 87,000 acres.  It was one of the largest wildfires in the United States in 2013.  Later, military officials conducted multiple investigations to find out why Army leaders signed off on the use of high explosive ammunition at a time when the National Weather Service had issued Red Flag Warnings. In response, training procedures have since been rewritten.

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Science
2:00 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Newly Forming Permafrost May Not Survive Century's End

Despite its formation, new permafrost at Twelvemile Lake near Fort Yukon is likely to disappear by the end of the century
Credit Martin Briggs / US Geological Survey

Fairbanks, AK - New permafrost is forming in the Arctic, but scientist don’t believe it will survive beyond the end of the century.  That’s according to a study that was published in the American Geophysical Union’s publication Geophysical Research Letters this spring.  Researchers made the discovery at a lake in Alaska’s Eastern Interior.

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Local News
6:00 am
Tue June 10, 2014

UA Board Approves $5 Million To Extend Work On Engineering Building

Credit UAF Engineering Building Project Facebook Page

The cost of a new engineering building on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus continues to rise as officials struggle to find ways to pay for its construction.  The Board of Regents agreed last week to add five million dollars to the project. 

The Board of Regents agreed to increase the spending limit for a new engineering building at UAF from $75 to more than $80 million. UAF Vice Chancellor Pat Pitney told the Board the added money will keep the project going through next April. 

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