Tim Ellis

FM News Reporter & On-Call Host

Tim has worked in the news business for nearly 30 years, mainly as a newspaper reporter and editor in southern Arizona. Tim first came to Alaska with his family in 1967, and grew up in Delta Junction before emigrating to the Lower 48 in 1977 to get a college education and see the world.

After graduating from Seattle University in 1983 with a degree in journalism, he relocated to southern Arizona, where he spent most of the next 25 years working as a print, broadcast and online journalist. He returned to Alaska – and radio – in 2010, when he was hired as a reporter/FM announcer for KUAC.

He now lives in Delta with his wife, Mary, and enjoys reading, woodworking, and hiking.

Ways to Connect

Climate change and the settlement of the New World …


An Arctic pathway for indigenous peoples ancestors …


Looking back at the U.S. Arctic Council chairmanship ...


NSIDC

It’s been a chilly winter here in the Interior and elsewhere around the state. But for the Arctic Ocean, it’s been one long warm spell. That’s led to another record-low year for formation of Arctic winter sea-ice cover.


Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation

Cleanup has resumed along a stretch of the Richardson Highway near Paxson, where more than 4,000 gallons of diesel was spilled when a Fairbanks-based tanker wrecked in January. But it may take years to clean up all the contamination.


No new U.S. Arctic policy – at least, not yet …


NSIDC

It’s been a relatively cool and snowy winter here in the Interior, compared with the past couple of winters. But climate experts say the Arctic has been warmer than average. They say that’s why it appears this year’s maximum Arctic sea-ice cover, measured near the end of winter, is likely to set another record for the smallest maximum on record.


Bringing broadband to the Arctic …


NOAA

Scientists who study Arctic climate say their research will suffer if the Trump administration goes ahead with big budget cuts reportedly under consideration for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. And they say the proposed cuts also would hinder meteorologists’ ability to forecast weather in Alaska and worldwide.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Fairbanks and Anchorage will both get a big economic boost in May during a series of events to be held in conjunction with a major meeting of top diplomats from the eight Arctic Council member nations. The Week of the Arctic will also enable the peoples of those nations to share their cultures.

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