Tom Gjelten

Both the challenges and opportunities of U.S. Christianity are evident at Fairmeadows Baptist Church in Duncanville, Texas, just south of Dallas.

On some Sundays, services at the church draw as few as a dozen worshippers, most of them white.

For the past year, however, the church has also been home to a largely Hispanic tenant congregation that calls itself Erez Baptist, and in that incarnation the church is thriving. The average Sunday attendance is around 80, and the congregation has a youth music group and already sponsors a missionary in Brazil.

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The newest museum in Washington, D.C., is a $500 million institution dedicated to a single book.

The privately funded Museum of the Bible, set to open Nov. 17, will focus on biblical history, biblical stories and the Bible's impact on the world.

"We only have one mission statement," says Cary Summers, the museum president, "and that is to engage people with the Bible."

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We are only about 24 hours past this shooting. NPR's Tom Gjelten, you've been covering this all day. And I want to ask you, what do you think we should expect that of the investigation tomorrow and in the coming days?

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Religion has played an outsized role in U.S. history and politics, but it's one that has often gone unrecognized in U.S. museums.

"As a focused subject area, it's been neglected," says Peter Manseau, a scholar and writer installed last year as the first full-time religion curator at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.

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