Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation

State environmental regulators have directed Carlile Transportation Systems to submit a cleanup plan for a small diesel-fuel spill that occurred after a Carlile tanker truck out of Fairbanks wrecked Oct. 17 on the Elliott Highway.


The City of North Pole today will begin soliciting contractors interested in working on a big project to expand the municipal water system. The project will more than double the number of customers now served by the city, in an effort to provide drinking water to areas where the groundwater has been contaminated by a chemical compound that for years leaked from the now-closed North Pole Refinery.


DVIDS/Air National Guard file photo

Officials with the Air Force and other agencies are asking members of the public to weigh-in on several proposals to provide drinking water to Moose Creek residents who can’t use their wells because of groundwater contamination. The pollution came from Eielson Air Force Base’s use of firefighting foam in years past. On Monday, North Pole City Council members made it clear they believe expanding their municipal water system to Moose Creek is the best alternative.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Cleanup work began this month at a mothballed pump station near Delta Junction that was part of the old Haines to Fairbanks Pipeline. Crews will remove contaminated materials from the Timber Pump Station and two other sites that were part of an old Army-operated pipeline built in the 1950s to transport fuel to the Interior’s three military bases.


Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation

Cleanup has resumed along a stretch of the Richardson Highway near Paxson, where more than 4,000 gallons of diesel was spilled when a Fairbanks-based tanker wrecked in January. But it may take years to clean up all the contamination.


KDLG file photo

A network of partnerships between nonprofit organizations, government agencies and private-sector recycling companies is planning to step up efforts to clean up junk and electronic waste that’s been accumulating for decades in remote communities around Alaska. The partnerships are racing to clean up as much of the stuff as possible by 2020, when federal funding for the projects is scheduled to run out.


Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation

Officials with the state Department of Environmental Conservation and a Fairbanks-based trucking company are still assessing the extent of a recent fuel spill along the Richardson Highway south of Paxson. Officials with the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation say it appears that diesel from a Colville Transport tanker crash has seeped into the road bed.


Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation

The driver of a diesel-fuel tanker truck lost control of his rig Monday and wrecked in a remote spot on the Richardson Highway south of Paxson, spilling some 4,000 gallons of diesel fuel. And now, officials with a Fairbanks-based trucking company and the state are trying to figure out a way to remove contaminated material from the area while allowing traffic to pass through the narrow, winding stretch of roadway.


Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation

Updated: An second situation report issued Wednesday afternoon by the Alaska Department of Conservation says the amount of diesel recovered from the spill now totals just over 3,500 gallons, down from the previous estimate of 5,000 gallons. DEC also says frequent monitoring of the area affected by the spill shows it had grown in size, indicating the spilled fuel continues to spread.


KUAC file photo

Clean air advocates say they’re disappointing that local and state regulators haven’t made more progress in getting the Fairbanks North Star Borough’s air-quality program up and going. As KUAC’s Tim Ellis reports, Citizens for Clean Air members are worried the slow-moving process could jeopardize the local program, because opponents are already working to get an initiative before voters in the fall.


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