Alaska Railroad

ReMax

An abandoned downtown Fairbanks landmark will see new life as a private school. Spruce Tree Montessori School has purchased the old Alaska Railroad Depot from the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. The depot located behind the News-Miner building has sat idle since the railroad sold it to the newspaper and relocated to a new Fairbanks station in 2005. As KUAC’s Dan Bross reports, the school plans to transform the languishing property.

Gas By Rail

Feb 3, 2015

The Alaska Railroad is among a few across the country seeking first ever approval to transport liquefied natural gas.  KUAC’s Dan Bross reports.

HDR Inc.

The state Department of Military and Veterans Affairs has hired a security firm to control access across the new Tanana River bridge at Salcha for hunters to get across to the training area west of the river.

Tim Ellis/KUAC

Motorists will finally get a break next month from the detours and congestion around a couple of major construction projects under way on the Richardson Highway south of Fairbanks. The work will wrap-up for the season on both the railroad-overpass and weigh-station projects – then ramp up again next year.


Alaska Railroad

State and Army officials have agreed on a procedure that will allow hunters to use the new Tanana River bridge in Salcha to get to military lands on the other side of the river. The agencies established the process in time for hunters to get access to military training areas in September.


Alaska Railroad

Alaska’s longest bridge is pretty much done. The 3,300-foot structure now spans the Tanana riverbed just west of Salcha, providing the military with year-round ground access to its training ranges on the far side. But, state officials don’t yet know where they’ll get funding to begin work on the next phase of the Northern Rail Extension project.


Alaska Railroad

*This story won Third Place for Best Reporting on Government or Politics from the Alaska Press Club in 2013.

Work on the big Alaska Railroad bridge across the Tanana River in Salcha is on track to be completed next August. But it looks like the state’s longest bridge won’t be getting much use over the next few years, because the Army doesn’t have money to build roads on the other side of the Tanana.


Flooding has devastated several Alaskan towns and villages this Breakup season, but residents of one Interior community are relieved that they didn’t get flooded this year. A levee built last year along the Tanana River in Salcha as part of a big bridge-construction project seems to have kept the river from doing what it’s been doing for the past several years: overflowing the Piledriver Slough and flooding a couple dozen homes in the area. KUAC’s Tim Ellis reports.

Alaska Railroad

Work is again under way in earnest on the state’s longest bridge, after a few weeks of down time over the holidays. The workers are hustling to complete several projects at the construction site in Salcha, and they hope to begin a new one – laying massive girders – before the ice begins to move on the Tanana River.


Kent Pollak/HDR Alaska

A Fairbanks-based trucking company is hauling dozens of massive support structures up the Richardson Highway over the next few months. The 165-foot steel girders will be used to build the Alaska Railroad bridge over the Tanana River at Salcha. Motorists who encounter the slow-moving convoys of trucks hauling the girders should drive carefully – and expect delays.


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