Arctic Research

Ten Alaskan communities will join hundreds of others worldwide Saturday to show support for science and the role it plays in improving the lives of people. Two Alaskans who’ll be participating in their communities’ March for Science observances say they’ll also be protesting steep budget cuts proposed for federal agencies and programs and politically-motivated attacks on science and scientists.


Internet Archive/Motherboard

The U.S. Arctic Research Commission set off alarms last week when a staffer inadvertently suggested the agency would halt its Twitter feed. The resulting uproar followed similar backlash over real blackouts at other federal agencies, resulting from a Trump administration gag order on their distribution of climate change information.


An Arctic Council changing of the guard, in Alaska …


A research plan for the peoples of the Arctic …


A new Arctic research plan – same as the old plan …


Fox News screengrab

There’s growing concern among the scientific community that President-elect Trump will reduce or eliminate support and funding for studying climate change. That includes scientists and researchers who study its impact on the Arctic.


A top-level Arctic science conference in Washington …


A better system for observing Arctic climate change …


More than a thousand scientists and policymakers from around the world, along with organizations representing indigenous peoples, industry and other interest are converging here in Fairbanks for Arctic Science Summit Week. They’re coming to nation’s leading Arctic-research university to share the latest information on rapid changes under way in the circumpolar north.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

The Research Vessel Sikuliaq was officially commissioned Saturday in a ceremony at the boats’s home port in Seward. As KUAC’s Tim Ellis reports, the commissioning marked the end of decades of efforts to design and build it; and the beginning of its mission to research the Earth’s rapidly changing and increasingly important polar regions.


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