carbon dioxide

Tim Ellis/KUAC

The University of Alaska Fairbanks is building a heat-and-power plant to replace the old facility that went into service in 1964. The new $245 million powerplant, scheduled to come online next year, will feature updated technology that’ll reduce most pollutants – but it will continue to emit  greenhouse gases blamed for warming the planet. Many on campus say that conflicts with UAF’s leadership in Arctic climate-change research.


A possible connection between climate change and noctilucent clouds …


A possible short-term benefit to a greenhouse gas …


The ripple effects of polar ice-melting …


“No matter what we do ... we cannot stop climate change in its tracks,” says John Holdren, President Obama’s science adviser. “It’s already having significant impacts. Those impacts will grow, and we need to be prepared for that.”


Ocean acidity threatening the marine food web …  


David Spindler/UAF Sun Star

Golden Valley Electric Association’s top executive says members should prepare for rate hikes to pay for GVEA’s response to new pollution controls on powerplants that the federal government announced today. The new rule will be phased in over the coming years in an effort to cut powerplants’ production of climate-changing greenhouse gases by about a third.


Emily Schwing

Fairbanks, AK - Elections, stormy weather, the impending winter darkness.... we all need to take a deep breath this time of year.  Luckily, our bodies can’t forget to breathe. But we have all forgotten when and how breathing began.  Now, scientists at the University of Alaska Fairbanks may have discovered the origins of the process.  The answer comes from a primitive fish that still swims Alaska's rivers.