Cory Borgeson

KUAC file photo

Lawyers representing the Delta Wind Farm are asking state regulators to deny a tariff filed by Golden Valley Electric Association that argues the utility should not be required to buy more power from the wind farm. It’s the latest in a years-long dispute between the owner of the wind farm, who wants to expand his facility, and GVEA’s board and management, who say the co-op can’t integrate more wind power now
without incurring costs that would be passed along to ratepayers.


KUAC file photo

Golden Valley Electric Association customers will see a slight decrease in their monthly bills next month, but well short of what GVEA had hoped to give ratepayers. That’s because the co-op has run into more problems with Healy 2 power plant.


Alaska Environmental Power

Delta Wind Farm President and CEO Mike Craft is taking the Regulatory Commission of Alaska to court. Craft is asking a judge to overturn the commission’s approval of a Golden Valley Electric Association tariff filed last summer. He claims the tariff violates new state regulations intended to help renewable-energy projects like his access the grid.


David Spindler/UAF Sun Star

Golden Valley Electric Association’s top executive says members should prepare for rate hikes to pay for GVEA’s response to new pollution controls on powerplants that the federal government announced today. The new rule will be phased in over the coming years in an effort to cut powerplants’ production of climate-changing greenhouse gases by about a third.


Alaska Environmental Power

Delta Wind Farm developer Mike Craft is ratcheting up pressure on Golden Valley Electric Association’s board and management, threatening them with legal action to force them to buy more wind-generated power – which they say state law requires.


GVEA

Golden Valley Electric Association’s $90 million wind farm near Healy is finally fully up and running. And GVEA ratepayers will start paying off the tab for the Eva Creek Wind Project next summer.