Galena

NANA

Alaska’s rural communities are increasingly looking to wind, solar and biomass to reduce their use of expensive diesel fuel to generate heat and electricity. Residents talked about their efforts to use renewable energy sources at this week’s Rural Energy Conference in Fairbanks.


KIYU / KIYU

(Fairbanks, AK.) The public radio station that serves middle Yukon River area communities is making due while the station’s building is being elevated. KIYU Galena general manager Brian Landrum says the facility is being raised above the high water level as a precaution in case of floods like the one that inundated the village 2 year ago this month.

“We’re goin’ up about 3 feet higher. We watched it being lifted and moved forward with 2 towers attached to it, and we had to bend back 2 towers to actually allow it to fit between the towers.  So it was certainly a site to see.”

Cubs Caught

Sep 29, 2014

Three orphaned bear cubs are safely in captivity after being captured by state biologists over the weekend in Galena. Alaska Department of Fish and Game spokeswoman Cathie Harms says the biologists caught the black bears using baited live traps.

“Friday evening, about 8:30, they were able to capture 2 of the 3 cubs, knowing that if they hadn’t caught all 3, the 3rd one would be more difficult, and it was, the 3rd one was very trap shy, so they watched him on Saturday and they tried on Saturday, and finally on Sunday at 3:30 in the morning, they caught the 3rd cub.”  

State of Alaska / Department of Fish and Game

State Fish and Game biologists are in Galena trying to capture 3 orphaned bear cubs.  The state initiated the effort after the cubs mother was reported killed by a local resident.  As KUAC’s Dan Bross reports, the state is also working to find the animals a new home.

Emily Schwing / KUAC

Fairbanks, AK - More than 300 firefighters from across are Alaska are in California battling wildfires for at least the next two weeks.  Most of them traveled from Interior Alaska villages for the Alaska Fire Service and the Alaska Division of Forestry.  The crews came through Fairbanks before they left for the lower 48.  For some, it’s a respite from village life. For others it will be the first time they’ve left the state.