renewable energy

Tim Ellis/KUAC

Engineers at UAF’s Alaska Center for Energy and Power have invented a device that should help promote greater use of renewable-energy sources such as wind and hydropower to generate electricity in small, remote communities. Center officials say development of the ST100 is an important milestone in their effort to boost the use of renewables to help communities save money by burning less diesel fuel to generate power.


Fox News screengrab

There’s growing concern among the scientific community that President-elect Trump will reduce or eliminate support and funding for studying climate change. That includes scientists and researchers who study its impact on the Arctic.


Adapting sustainable-energy technology for the remote communities …  


Harnessing rivers to generate electricity …

President Obama announced his upcoming visit to Alaska in a video that includes scenes of destruction from storm surges, flooding and wildfires.


Van Ness Feldman

Dozens of national experts on ocean policy, research and business gathered at the University of Alaska Fairbanks this week to talk about how climate change is affecting the Arctic Ocean and coastal communities. Members of the Joint Ocean Commission Initiative’s held an Arctic Ocean Leadership Roundtable at UAF to learn about its ongoing Arctic-research resources, and then traveled north to talk with Inuit people to get their perspective on changes they've seen in the region.


U.S. Department of Energy

The lights are back on in Fort Yukon, including the Christmas trees, now that three of the village’s four electrical generators are functioning again.
A couple of weeks ago, the holidays didn’t look so happy for the remote Yukon River community, when all but one of its generators broke down. But the community got through by cutting back and helping each other out.
And it all happened just as the utility was planning to build a new powerplant that will reduce their dependence on diesel-fueled generators.


CCHRC

Alaska rates near the bottom in a nationwide survey on how states are improving energy-efficiency programs. But a state energy official says the survey may not be giving Alaska enough credit for the programs it has put in place in recent years.


Alaska Center for Energy and Power

The Ninth Rural Energy Conference gets under way Tuesday here in Fairbanks. The three-day gathering of experts and advocates will examine how Alaska’s rural residents get electricity, and how they might get it in the future more efficiently – and less expensively.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

*This story won Third Place for Best Environmental Reporting from the Alaska Press Club in 2013.

The Cold Climate Housing Research Center in Fairbanks moved ahead Wednesday on a project that will demonstrate how solar energy can be collected year-round and used to heat a commercial building without fossil fuels, like heating oil. The project is being funded by one of the world’s biggest fossil-fuel companies.