sulfolane

Work on a $52 million project to expand North Pole’s municipal water system is expected to begin within a few weeks, now the City Council has awarded the contract to a Fairbanks company. The project will extend the system into areas where the groundwater was contaminated by a chemical compound that leaked from the now-shuttered North Pole Refinery more than a decade ago.


The City of North Pole today will begin soliciting contractors interested in working on a big project to expand the municipal water system. The project will more than double the number of customers now served by the city, in an effort to provide drinking water to areas where the groundwater has been contaminated by a chemical compound that for years leaked from the now-closed North Pole Refinery.


City of North Pole

The North Pole City Council tonight will consider awarding a contract to an engineering company to develop a plan intended to protect the community’s groundwater from contamination. The mayor says the plan is needed to ensure the city will be able to expand its municipal water system to areas where the groundwater already is contaminated.


Flint Hills continues to push for a less stringent standard for removal of a spilled chemical from groundwater at the company’s shuttered North Pole refinery. As KUAC’s Dan Bross reports, removal of the industrial solvent sulfolane (SULL-fo-lane) is costing the refinery a lot of money, and opinions differ on how clean groundwater should be.

Flint Hills Resources

A federal agency will conduct a study to determine the danger of drinking groundwater contaminated by the industrial solvent sulfolane (SULL-fo-lane) in the North Pole area. The research was sought by the state of Alaska as it tries to set a clean up level for wells tainted by sufolane from spills at a local oil refinery. As KUAC’s Dan Bross reports, the new study will delay a determination on what constitutes safe water.

Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation

It appears the dispute over how much to clean up contaminated groundwater in the North Pole area will continue into the new year. As KUAC’s Tim Ellis reports, officials with the state’s environmental regulatory agency are still reviewing studies to help them decide on a safe cleanup level for the chemical that leaked from a North Pole refinery into the area’s groundwater.


KUAC file photo

The city of North Pole has filed a lawsuit against the past and present owners of the refinery that leaked the industrial solvent sulfolane into the area’s groundwater.


KUAC file photo

State officials have approved a plan proposed by Flint Hills Resources-Alaska to continue an ongoing cleanup of sulfolane and other contaminants that have leaked from its North Pole refinery since the 1970s.The agreement may help improve the chances of Flint Hills eventually selling the refinery, which it closed in May.


KUAC file photo

A panel of experts wrapped up two days of meetings Thursday in Fairbanks that will help the state Department of Environmental Conservation determine the appropriate cleanup level for contamination of North Pole’s groundwater caused by chemicals leaking from the refinery now owned by Flint Hills Resources.


Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation

An independent panel of experts will meet here in Fairbanks later this month to review the state environmental agency’s recommended cleanup level for sulfolane contamination in the North Pole area’s groundwater.

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