Tok

Tim Ellis/KUAC

Cleanup work began this month at a mothballed pump station near Delta Junction that was part of the old Haines to Fairbanks Pipeline. Crews will remove contaminated materials from the Timber Pump Station and two other sites that were part of an old Army-operated pipeline built in the 1950s to transport fuel to the Interior’s three military bases.


Delta Junction Chamber of Commerce

Seventy-five years ago, the U.S. Army began work on a road to connect the far-flung territory of Alaska to the continental United States. This week, the town at the end of that road, Delta Junction, will consider a proposal to celebrate the Alaska Highway’s 75th anniversary. Organizers of a statewide effort to commemorate the anniversary say the highway represents an important historical achievement and a breakthough in race relations.


AP&T

The utility that provides power to Tok is looking into using liquefied natural gas as a way to reduce the cost of generating electricity for the Alaska Highway community. KUAC’s Tim Ellis reports.


Jeff Wells / Alaska Department of Fish and Game

State officials came to the aid of a bear with a can stuck on its head along the Alaska Highway. KUAC’s Dan Bross reports.

U.S. Department of Agriculture

A Native village corporation near Tok and the utility that serves that area have partnered up on a venture to build a small hydroelectric project that could reduce the area’s high energy costs. Alaska Power and Telephone officials say the partnership will now seek state and private funding and for the $19 million project.


KUAC file photo

Alaska Power Company customers in Tok and other small communities in the eastern Interior saw their electricity bills go up this year.  Utility rate hikes are nothing new in rural Alaska, but they aren’t always strictly due to rising fuel prices.  Some Alaska Power customers are frustrated because they’re being charged more in part because of efforts to conserve electricity – and generate it themselves.


KUAC file photo

Business and community leaders in Tok are trying to revive a plan to cut the area’s high energy costs by generating electricity using biomass. That’s a type of fuel made from grinding timber like black spruce into chips. Backers of the plan want the state to give them a break on timber-sale contract conditions to help attract financing for a biomass-fired powerplant. They say that’s what put the plan on hold last year.


Nancy Arpino

Alaska’s summer tourism season is winding down, and merchants in some communities around the Interior are already looking ahead to next year – and worrying how they’ll deal with the loss of business caused by a major tour-company’s decision to discontinue transporting tourists on buses.


A Wasilla-based company has launched a new bus service that runs twice weekly on the Parks Highway between Fairbanks and Wasilla, and points in between. Schleuter Services’s buses provide economical public transportation between the Interior and Southcentral, and an essential link on the road system that enables Alaskans in rural areas to get to and from the jobs, shopping, family and friends in the city – without having to move from their communities. KUAC’s Tim Ellis reports.

Tim Ellis/KUAC file photo

The Alaska Division of Forestry has given the go-ahead to a long-term timber sales contract that would allow a company to harvest trees on state forest land around Tok. The timber would be used as fuel for a proposed biomass power-generating station that would provide electricity for the community – and make the area safer from wildfires.


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