wind power

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Alaska’s rural communities are increasingly looking to wind, solar and biomass to reduce their use of expensive diesel fuel to generate heat and electricity. Residents talked about their efforts to use renewable energy sources at this week’s Rural Energy Conference in Fairbanks.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

About 400 people from around Alaska and elsewhere converged on the Westmark Fairbanks Hotel and Conference Center Tuesday to talk about how residents of the state’s rural and remote communities can reduce high energy costs during the 20th Rural Energy Conference.


KUAC file photo

The Regulatory Commission of Alaska has sided with Golden Valley Electric Association in its case against a wind-power developer’s proposal to sell up to 13.5 megawatts of electricity to the co-op.

KUAC graphic

President Trump says he’s ready to move ahead this year on his campaign pledge to pass a trillion-dollar program to improve the nation’s infrastructure. That’s motivated officials with a Glennallen-based economic development organization and the electrical co-op that serves the area to dust off an old plan to build a 300-mile-long high-tension power line that would run from the Mat-Su Valley community of Sutton to Tok and Delta Junction.


KUAC file photo

Lawyers representing the Delta Wind Farm are asking state regulators to deny a tariff filed by Golden Valley Electric Association that argues the utility should not be required to buy more power from the wind farm. It’s the latest in a years-long dispute between the owner of the wind farm, who wants to expand his facility, and GVEA’s board and management, who say the co-op can’t integrate more wind power now
without incurring costs that would be passed along to ratepayers.


An Alaskan entrepreneur is building a sustainable energy-powered greenhouse in Alaska to grow produce year-round.


A Fairbanks based alternative energy company continues to push Golden Valley Electric Association to buy more of its wind power. Alaska Environmental Power operates a wind farm in Delta Junction, and recently teamed with an Anchorage law firm on a report it hopes will sway utility members. KUAC’s Dan Bross reports.

Tim Ellis/KUAC

Updated: Wind-power developer Mike Craft convinced state regulators this week to consider changing rules on how Alaska utilities deal with independent energy producers, especially the system used to pay the independent producers for the electricity they produce for the grid. Craft says the changes are needed to get the utilities to comply with state law that requires utilities to buy power from independent producers and sets a goal of generating half of the state’s electricity with renewables by 2025. He also hopes it’ll enable him to develop a 25-megawatt wind farm near Delta Junction and sell the power to GVEA.