Iditarod

Emily Schwing / KUAC

Nulato, AK - Iditarod mushers kept volunteers in the Nulato checkpoint busy overnight. Some teams that weren’t expected to stay grabbed a few hours rest in the sleepy Yukon River village, while others decided to move along.

Emily Schwing / KUAC

Galena, AK - Mushers and their dog teams passed in and out of Galena on various schedules throughout the afternoon.

Martin Buser was the first to take off out of the second checkpoint along the Yukon River.  As he put booties on his dogs, he teased Aaron Burmeister about his howling team. “You have to breed a little better eaters there Aaron!” called Buser. 

Emily Schwing / KUAC

Ruby, AK - Some mushers are still trying to hold dog teams back despite the fast Yukon River miles ahead.  The most experienced mushers know the river miles can be fast, but there’s still a tough run up the Bering Sea Coast ahead.

Four-time Champion Jeff King has run the Iditarod 23 times.  He knows exactly what it means when teams reach the Yukon River. “Well, it will be a chance to really evaluate team speed,” he says.

Iditarod Strategies Make for Some Head Scratching

Mar 7, 2014
Emily Schwing / KUAC

Ruby, AK - As dogs teams drop onto the Yukon River, Iditarod mushers will find out how their race plans are playing out.  The next 140 miles of long, flat river will shine some light on who has the most speed and who needs a little more rest.

Takotna, AK - Iditarod teams remain large.  Most mushers are still running teams of 14 or more dogs. Mushers are surprised at how many dogs fared well through some of the roughest trail they’ve seen in the race’s history.

Emily Schwing / KUAC

Takotna, AK - As teams come off their mandatory 24 hour rest and head for the Yukon River, they’ll be thinking of how best to pick up the pace in what is turning out to be one of the most dramatic, but also the most competitive races in Iditarod history. 

Emily Schwing / KUAC

McGrath, AK - In the aftermath of Tuesday’s rough run through the Dalzell Gorge and into Nikolai, many Iditarod mushers have had to act fast to change their race plans. 

Emily Schwing / KUAC

McGrath, AK - The Iditarod trail continued to claim victims through Tuesday.  Reports of everything from broken ankles to broken hands came filtering back from Rohn and Nikolai.  It will take a combination of resilience and persistence for mushers to keep moving down the trail.

Before mushers ever left Willow, four-time champion Jeff King predicted more than a few teams would never make it past Nikolai. “There will be some race ending circumstances for some of the teams early in the race,” he said.

Mushers Hold Back on Speed

Mar 4, 2014
Emily Schwing / KUAC

Rainy Pass, AK - Iditarod mushers are working hard to hold back teams on what has been an icy, hard packed trail.  A snowless, rocky stretch of trail through a burn will slow them down, but most mushers are riding their brakes.

Teams Take a Beating in the Alaska Range

Mar 4, 2014
Emily Schwing / KUAC

Rainy Pass, AK - Mushers are taking a beating on their way through the Alaska Range as the make their way down the Iditarod Trail.  There are plenty of stories about banged up gear and broken equipment.

There’s a place on the Iditarod trail where the route vanishes over a small cliff, twice. These are the Happy River Steps and they gave DeeDee Jonrowe a bit of a scare this time around. “I don’t enjoy what I just did,” she says grimly.

Pages