Kimberlee Beckmen

ADF&G

The state Fish and Game Department says tularemia is showing up early this year in snowshoe hares around the Interior and areas south of the Alaska Range. So a state veterinarian is warning people who own pets or livestock to watch out for the disease – and for predators that usually prey on the hares.


Alaska Department of Fish and Game

The state Department of Fish and Game is warning pet owners in the Interior and southcentral Alaska about a recent spike in reports of tularemia – sometimes called “rabbit fever.” The disease is treatable, but it’s essential to get an animal to a veterinarian as soon as possible when they’re showing symptoms, like high fever.


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is asking for the public’s help in reporting sightings of mule deer around the Interior. The deer isn’t indigenous to Alaska, but Fish and Game experts believe the species has been slowly spreading into the Interior from the Yukon Territory. The experts are concerned they may be carrying a parasite that could devastate local moose populations.