Regulatory Commission of Alaska

energy.gov

A Colorado-based company’s proposal to generate and sell 100 megawatts to Golden Valley Electric Association has devolved into a dispute involving state and federal energy agencies. Golden Valley officials say they’ve got concerns about Eco Green Generation’s hybrid renewable-energy proposal, so they’ve halted work on a tariff they’re required to file in response. State regulators have OK’d GVEA's request to suspend the tariff until federal regulators rule on the utility’s request to declare Eco Green is unqualified to submit the proposal.


KUAC file photo

Golden Valley Electric Association has halted work on a study requested by a Colorado-based company and its Fairbanks partner that proposes to add 55 megawatts to the grid. Golden Valley President and CEO Cory Borgeson says GVEA last week suspended an interconnection study requested by Eco Green Generation until a federal agency certifies that the company meets requirements of a law that regulates independent power producers that generate electricity with renewable energy, like wind.


KUAC file photo

The Regulatory Commission of Alaska has sided with Golden Valley Electric Association in its case against a wind-power developer’s proposal to sell up to 13.5 megawatts of electricity to the co-op.

ML&P

Golden Valley Electric Association floated two letters of interest late last year suggesting the co-op was interested in buying the Municipality of Anchorage’s electric utility, Municipal Light and Power, for up to a billion dollars. Municipality officials have instead accepted a purchase offer by Anchorage-based Chugach Electric Association. But Golden Valley’s top executive says GVEA’s offer was mainly motivated over a concern the sale could increase ratepayers’ monthly bills.


cetfund.org

Updated: Fairbanks state Representative David Guttenberg will host a workshop Saturday on the UAF campus that'll explore the lack of broadband internet access in Alaska and what’s being done to make it more available. See editor's note for link to live webcast of workshop.

Alaska Environmental Power

Fairbanks wind-power developer Mike Craft took Golden Valley Electric Association to court this week, claiming the utility is violating state and federal law by refusing to buy more electricity generated by a Delta Junction-area wind farm. Craft turned to the courts after four years of fighting with Golden Valley and working with state regulators to adopt federal policies intended to promote greater use of renewable energy.


KUAC file photo

Lawyers representing the Delta Wind Farm are asking state regulators to deny a tariff filed by Golden Valley Electric Association that argues the utility should not be required to buy more power from the wind farm. It’s the latest in a years-long dispute between the owner of the wind farm, who wants to expand his facility, and GVEA’s board and management, who say the co-op can’t integrate more wind power now
without incurring costs that would be passed along to ratepayers.


Alaska Environmental Power

Delta Wind Farm President and CEO Mike Craft is taking the Regulatory Commission of Alaska to court. Craft is asking a judge to overturn the commission’s approval of a Golden Valley Electric Association tariff filed last summer. He claims the tariff violates new state regulations intended to help renewable-energy projects like his access the grid.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

City of Delta Junction officials are worried about the rising cost of operating the city’s landfill. And they’re  wondering what happened to the 400 tons of trash they were expecting to be dumped there.


KUAC file photo

Alaska Power Company customers in Tok and other small communities in the eastern Interior saw their electricity bills go up this year.  Utility rate hikes are nothing new in rural Alaska, but they aren’t always strictly due to rising fuel prices.  Some Alaska Power customers are frustrated because they’re being charged more in part because of efforts to conserve electricity – and generate it themselves.


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