sea ice

It’s a challenge for news media to keep up their reporting on climate change’s impact on the Arctic, because of the pace of change and scientists new findings on, for example, the melting of polar sea ice.

A progress report on the nation’s newest polar research ship...


Van Ness Feldman

Dozens of national experts on ocean policy, research and business gathered at the University of Alaska Fairbanks this week to talk about how climate change is affecting the Arctic Ocean and coastal communities. Members of the Joint Ocean Commission Initiative’s held an Arctic Ocean Leadership Roundtable at UAF to learn about its ongoing Arctic-research resources, and then traveled north to talk with Inuit people to get their perspective on changes they've seen in the region.


John Grahame Holmes/VIREO / National Audobon Society, http://birds.audubon.org/birds/boreal-owl

Fairbanks, AK - America’s birds are in trouble. That’s according to two reports out earlier this month from the National Audubon Society and the Department of Interior.  Both documents indicate climate change could have dire effects for many of the birds that migrate to Alaska each year.

Chris Larsen/University of Alaska-Fairbanks

Fairbanks, AK - Alaska’s glaciers are shrinking faster than scientists had thought, but glaciers that terminate in the ocean may be relatively resilient to climate change in comparison to their land-locked counterparts.  The data comes from a multi-year airborne survey conducted by NASA.

NASA

NASA is piloting a mission out of Fairbanks with a specialized plane that can fly high enough to test technology destined for satellite applications. KUAC’s Dan Bross has more on the ER2 mission.

Fairbanks, AK - Year-to-year forecasts of summer Arctic Sea Ice extent aren’t reliable.  That’s according to a report out from the National Snow and Ice Data Center. But A two-day workshop that starts Tuesday in Colorado will focus on ways to improve sea ice extent predictions.

Arctic Winter Sea Ice Extent is Sixth Lowest on Record

Mar 27, 2013
NSIDC

Fairbanks, AK - The National Snow and Ice Data center based in Colorado report arctic sea ice reached its maximum extent for the winter on March fifteenth.

This year’s winter-time sea ice extent is the sixth lowest since the National Snow and Ice Data Center started keeping satellite records in 1979. Walt Meier is a research scientist at NSIDC.  “In winter, we used to be about 16 million square kilometers, which is about double the lower 48 United States," says Meier.

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