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A very small percentage of Americans are now serving in the military — fewer than 1 percent. Some are looking for direction. Others are inspired by a sense of patriotism or by a family member who served in an earlier war. On this Independence Day, we continue with an occasional series, Those Who Serve, a look at the men and women wearing their country's uniform during a time of war.

Capt. Jared Larpenteur is from Cajun Country in Louisiana. His family never expected he'd make the military his career.

We hold this truth to be self-evident: America loves pie. We, the people, a nation of bakers and eaters, value the art of creating that crispy, gooey, fluffy, fruity dessert — and each region reserves the right to bake the treat in its own individual style.

It is not facetious to say that dying may not have been the worst thing to happen to Joe Paterno this past year.

Columbus Zoo Visitors Witness Family Feud

Jul 3, 2012

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Sandwich Monday: Out Of The Office

Jul 2, 2012

Most of the Sandwich Monday crew is out of the office, so we're taking a little break. Robert is following around the Filipino rock band Sandwich, Peter is shipwrecked on Efate, formerly known as Sandwich Island, Eva is attempting to prove the Ham Sandwich Theorem, and Mike is hosting a screening of the 2011 Malayalam film Sandwich. Me?

The transporting music of Exitmusic is so grandiose, so romantically rich, it could easily envelop a concert hall or cavernous church. It's a beautifully buzzing mix of distorted guitars, synth pads and sparse electronic beats, all of which intermingle around Aleksa Palladino's alluring, heartsick voice like a swarm of bees in your chest.

Every musician practices differently. Some turn their own living rooms into rehearsal spaces. Others, like pianist Jonathan Biss, prefer to step out of the comforts of home and into a studio. "It's a more productive way of working," Biss told us as we barged in with cameras and microphones.

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