Tim Ellis

FM News Reporter & On-Call Host

Tim has worked in the news business for nearly 30 years, mainly as a newspaper reporter and editor in southern Arizona. Tim first came to Alaska with his family in 1967, and grew up in Delta Junction before emigrating to the Lower 48 in 1977 to get a college education and see the world.

After graduating from Seattle University in 1983 with a degree in journalism, he relocated to southern Arizona, where he spent most of the next 25 years working as a print, broadcast and online journalist. He returned to Alaska – and radio – in 2010, when he was hired as a reporter/FM announcer for KUAC.

He now lives in Delta with his wife, Mary, and enjoys reading, woodworking, and hiking.

Ways to Connect

North Pole’s City Council advanced an ordinance Monday to boost the city’s property tax by about 67 percent in the coming year. The council also unanimously adopted an ordinance also would boost fees the city charges for ambulance transports.

Tim Ellis/KUAC

The Interior Gas Utility’s general manager and board chairman held the first of two sessions Tuesday intended to help the public understand the IGU’s $59.5 million proposal to buy Pentex Alaska LNG Co., the parent company of Fairbanks Natural Gas and its LNG-processing and storage facilities in Southcentral. The IGU board is scheduled to vote on the deal on Dec. 5.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

About 70 people turned out Thursday night for a meeting in Fairbanks to talk about the proposed Ambler Road project. That’s the 211-mile two-lane gravel roadway the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority is proposing to build from the Dalton Highway to a mineral-rich site near the village of Ambler, in the northwest corner of the state. Backers of the project say it’ll create jobs and other economic benefits for the region and the state. Opponents say it’s a fiscal boondoggle that’ll bring pollution, disrupt habitat and harm subsistence hunting and fishing.


City of Fairbanks

Hundreds of local government officials from around the state are in Anchorage this week for the Alaska Municipal League’s annual local-government conference. At the top of their agenda is finding ways to deal with cuts in state funding that in turn have forced the municipalities to reduce services and raise local taxes.


Missile Defense Agency

The Trump administration announced last week it has asked Congress to appropriate $2.1 billion to expand the missile-defense base on Fort Greely.

Tim Ellis/KUAC

The Interior Gas Utility has scheduled a couple of public meetings for later this month to inform Fairbanks North Star Borough residents about the status of the IGU board’s proposal to buy Pentex Alaska Natural Gas Company as part of the local utility’s efforts to build a natural-gas distribution system for Fairbanks and North Pole.


Several residents of a North Pole neighborhood told Fairbanks North Star Borough Assembly members Thursday that they do not want a marijuana-growing business in the area. Their arguments swayed half the members, but that wasn’t enough to pass a measure that would’ve opposed state approval of a business license for the facility.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Unseasonably warm and wet weather last month laid down a coating of hard-to-remove all around the Interior. That’s kept the crews that remove snow and ice from roads and runways busy.


State environmental regulators have directed Carlile Transportation Systems to submit a cleanup plan for a small diesel-fuel spill that occurred after a Carlile tanker truck out of Fairbanks wrecked Oct. 17 on the Elliott Highway.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Anthropologists with the University of Alaska Fairbanks say a site they’re excavating near the Delta River west of Fort Greely was first inhabited by people some 13,000 years ago – not long after humanity crossed over a now-submerged land bridge that connected Asia and North America. The anthropologists say that’s just one of the many discoveries they’ve made at the Delta River Overlook. And they say they’re just beginning to uncover its secrets.


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