Tim Ellis

FM News Reporter & On-Call Host

Tim has worked in the news business for nearly 30 years, mainly as a newspaper reporter and editor in southern Arizona. Tim first came to Alaska with his family in 1967, and grew up in Delta Junction before emigrating to the Lower 48 in 1977 to get a college education and see the world.

After graduating from Seattle University in 1983 with a degree in journalism, he relocated to southern Arizona, where he spent most of the next 25 years working as a print, broadcast and online journalist. He returned to Alaska – and radio – in 2010, when he was hired as a reporter/FM announcer for KUAC.

He now lives in Delta with his wife, Mary, and enjoys reading, woodworking, and hiking.

Ways to Connect

Tim Ellis/KUAC

The Fairbanks North Star Borough School District Board of Education on Wednesday narrowly approved the administration’s recommended $232 million budget for next school year. That’s 3.3 percent or about $8 million lower than this year’s budget, mainly due to anticipated cuts in both borough and state funding and a slight drop in enrollment. It would require the district to increase class sizes and cut nearly 50 jobs, and sharply cut back on sports and other activities – unless the Assembly and Legislature come through with more funding.

Owners of local marijuana businesses told the Fairbanks City Council Monday that the free market should decide how many retail pot shops the city should allow. The owners and other advocates told council members a proposed ordinance that would limit the number of shops and impose other regulations on the industry could stifle the economic benefits it’s generating.

Office of the Governor

Governor Bill Walker is inviting businesspersons from around the state who are interested in boosting trade with Alaska’s largest international trading partner to come along on a China trade mission to be launched in May.  A member of the Walker administration says the governor is especially interested in bringing along representatives of the mining and tourism industries.

Eric Engman/Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Updated: A Fairbanks grand jury has indicted 13 Fairbanks Correctional Center inmates on charges of rioting and criminal mischief related to an August 17th riot at the jail. The inmates took over a part of the jail for about an hour and a half before surrendering after they were tear-gassed by members of two tactical police units that were called in.

Tim Ellis/KUAC

More than 60 homes around Fairbanks International Airport will be hooked-up to the College Utilities water system this summer, because area residents can’t get their drinking water from wells anymore due to groundwater contamination. But about 50 homeowners and others who showed up at a meeting Tuesday say they still have a lot of questions about the project – and the contamination.

Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities

A snowier-than-average winter and four consecutive years of budget cuts and have stretched the state Department of Transportation’s ability to plow state roads to the limit. Department Commissioner Marc Luiken says that’s forced him and his workers to come up with more efficient ways to get the job done.


Updated: A state Department of Environmental Conservation report issued Tuesday night  says an Army tanker truck that crashed Sunday near Harding Lake leaked 800 gallons of fuel within about 50 feet of a slough that leads into the Tanana River.

U.S. Army

Army officials have begun the years-long process of decommissioning Alaska’s first and only nuclear powerplant, located at Fort Greely. The facility was built during the height of the Cold War, then shut down in 1972 after 10 years of on-and-off operation. Much of it was dismantled and disposed, the rest encased in concrete. And now, the Army Corps of Engineers plans to remove most or perhaps all of what’s left of the plant.

KUAC file photo

Golden Valley Electric Association’s chief executive says repair work on the co-op’s problem-plagued Healy 2 powerplant should be completed next month. And if all goes well, President and CEO Cory Borgeson says the coal-fired powerplant will be restarted in May.

A proposed ordinance that would that would place limits on the local marijuana industry drew a capacity crowd to Fairbanks City Council chambers Monday night. About 20 of those at the meeting gave council members an earful about the ordinance, which would limit the number of marijuana retail shops in the city, prohibit on-site consumption and increase buffer-zone distances between the shops and residential areas, schools and drug and alcohol rehab facilities. In the end, council members decided to postpone voting on the ordinance until May – and in the meanwhile they plan to form a working group to include representatives of the local cannabis industry and others.