Tim Ellis

FM News Reporter & On-Call Host

Tim has worked in the news business for nearly 30 years, mainly as a newspaper reporter and editor in southern Arizona. Tim first came to Alaska with his family in 1967, and grew up in Delta Junction before emigrating to the Lower 48 in 1977 to get a college education and see the world.

After graduating from Seattle University in 1983 with a degree in journalism, he relocated to southern Arizona, where he spent most of the next 25 years working as a print, broadcast and online journalist. He returned to Alaska – and radio – in 2010, when he was hired as a reporter/FM announcer for KUAC.

He now lives in Delta with his wife, Mary, and enjoys reading, woodworking, and hiking.

Ways to Connect

publichealth.oregon.gov

The commercial marijuana industry is increasing demand for electricity in the Interior. Golden Valley Electric Association membership includes 47 licensed marijuana growers, who paid the co-op more than a half-million dollars for power over the past year.


freepik.com

Local elections like the one coming up on Oct. 3 are notorious for drawing low voter turnout. But observers say this year’s city and borough elections may be different, because the two marijuana-related propositions on the ballots are likely to draw more voters to the polls in what observers say will likely be a close election.


public.health.oregon.gov

Two weeks from tomorrow, city and borough voters will decide whether to outlaw marijuana-related businesses in the two jurisdictions. Advocates and opponents of the two ballot measures that would outlaw pot growing and sales have ramped up their campaigns in recent weeks. Some of the concerns and issues both sides raise were reflected in comments by Fairbanks City Council members last Monday as they considered an application to open a retail cannabis shop.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

The first candidate forum of the season drew 5 people running for Fairbanks North Star Borough Assembly and 2 for Fairbanks city council. The annual Interior Taxpayers Association hosted forum focused on local government’s response to state funding cuts.

Tim Ellis/KUAC

The University of Alaska Fairbanks is building a heat-and-power plant to replace the old facility that went into service in 1964. The new $245 million powerplant, scheduled to come online next year, will feature updated technology that’ll reduce most pollutants – but it will continue to emit  greenhouse gases blamed for warming the planet. Many on campus say that conflicts with UAF’s leadership in Arctic climate-change research.


U.S. Pacific Command

The Fairbanks City Council on Monday voted 6-0 to advance an ordinance that if approved would help city residents and businesses deal with contaminated groundwater on the city’s south side.

Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities

Work is wrapping on a project to rebuild the northernmost stretch of the Dalton Highway that was badly damaged two-and-a-half years ago by flooding from the overflowing Sagavanirktok River. Once that and two other road-improvement projects on that part of the Dalton are all complete, the state plans to pave the 52-mile stretch of the road.


Alaska Environmental Power

Fairbanks wind-power developer Mike Craft took Golden Valley Electric Association to court this week, claiming the utility is violating state and federal law by refusing to buy more electricity generated by a Delta Junction-area wind farm. Craft turned to the courts after four years of fighting with Golden Valley and working with state regulators to adopt federal policies intended to promote greater use of renewable energy.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Golden Valley Electric Association’s board of directors approved a multimillion-dollar plan Monday to repair the Healy 2 power plant. Two board members voted against the proposal, saying they’ve got concerns about the coal-fired plant design and cost.


Rick Thoman/NOAA

Overnight low temperatures have dropped down to freezing in some spots around the Interior over the past week, including Denali Park to the south and Eagle to the east. It hasn’t dropped that much yet in the Fairbanks area – but it’s overdue.


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