Tim Ellis

FM News Reporter & On-Call Host

Tim has worked in the news business for nearly 30 years, mainly as a newspaper reporter and editor in southern Arizona. Tim first came to Alaska with his family in 1967, and grew up in Delta Junction before emigrating to the Lower 48 in 1977 to get a college education and see the world.

After graduating from Seattle University in 1983 with a degree in journalism, he relocated to southern Arizona, where he spent most of the next 25 years working as a print, broadcast and online journalist. He returned to Alaska – and radio – in 2010, when he was hired as a reporter/FM announcer for KUAC.

He now lives in Delta with his wife, Mary, and enjoys reading, woodworking, and hiking.

Ways to Connect

Tim Ellis/KUAC

Unseasonably warm and wet weather last month laid down a coating of hard-to-remove all around the Interior. That’s kept the crews that remove snow and ice from roads and runways busy.


State environmental regulators have directed Carlile Transportation Systems to submit a cleanup plan for a small diesel-fuel spill that occurred after a Carlile tanker truck out of Fairbanks wrecked Oct. 17 on the Elliott Highway.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Anthropologists with the University of Alaska Fairbanks say a site they’re excavating near the Delta River west of Fort Greely was first inhabited by people some 13,000 years ago – not long after humanity crossed over a now-submerged land bridge that connected Asia and North America. The anthropologists say that’s just one of the many discoveries they’ve made at the Delta River Overlook. And they say they’re just beginning to uncover its secrets.


WBUR

Four public buildings around Fairbanks will offer more electrical outlets in their parking lots next year to encourage customers to plug-in their engine-block heaters during cold snaps. The project is intended to help improve the area’s air quality.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Fairbanks North Star Borough Mayor Karl Kassel says most of the borough’s 250 or so buildings are badly in need of maintenance. He says many are so old that they just need to be torn down and replaced. And he says it’ll cost nearly $400 million to catch up on that backlog. The mayor told a couple hundred area residents who showed up for two meetings Wednesday that they and their local elected leaders will have to solve the problem, because it’s unlikely the state will pay for much, if any, of that work.


Seattle University Spectator

Fairbanks North Star Borough Mayor Karl Kassel says state officials have cut funding to the borough for three straight years now, and it appears likely that’ll continue in the years ahead. The mayor says borough officials face some tough choices on how to deal with those cuts, so he’s scheduled two public meetings for Wednesday to talk about the problem – and ask borough residents what they think ought to be done about it.


The City of North Pole today will begin soliciting contractors interested in working on a big project to expand the municipal water system. The project will more than double the number of customers now served by the city, in an effort to provide drinking water to areas where the groundwater has been contaminated by a chemical compound that for years leaked from the now-closed North Pole Refinery.


Penn State College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

The Fairbanks North Star Borough Assembly last week delayed consideration of technology that could reduce emissions from wood heating. An ordinance sponsored by Assembly member Lance Roberts would include installation of electrostatic precipitators as part of the borough’s wood-stove changeout program. The stack-mounted devices use static electricity to remove health-damaging fine particulates from smoke.


Isaac Johnson/354th FW public affairs

Fairbanks North Star Borough Mayor Karl Kassel says the buildup associated with two squadrons of F-35 warplanes that’ll be coming to Eielson Air Force Base in a couple of years will offset decreases in population and state funding that are both being driven by Alaska’s recession-wracked economy.


Isaac Johnson/354th FW public affairs

Eielson Air Force Base opened its doors Tuesday to local, state and federal officials to give them a chance to see an F-35 fighter up close and to learn about its capabilities. The Air Force sent the warplane here for a few weeks for testing in anticipation of the arrival of two squadrons beginning in 2020.


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