Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.

Over the years, he has reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders, and Ponzi schemers. Most recently, he has focused on trade and the job market. He also worked as part of a team covering President Trump's business interests.

Before moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position, he reported from the United Nations and was also involved in NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings, and the Fukushima earthquake.

Before joining NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

He lives in Manhattan, loves to read, and is a devoted (but not at all fast) runner.

Zarroli grew up in Wilmington, Delaware, in a family of six kids and graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

At 74, Steven Hoffenberg spends a lot of time reflecting on his long and checkered past, which included a lengthy prison sentence for running a Ponzi scheme.

Since last weekend, he says his thoughts have increasingly turned to the man he says conspired with him in that scheme — the notorious sex criminal Jeffrey Epstein, who was found dead in his cell at New York's Metropolitan Correctional Center last Saturday.

When Nancy Dunne goes to see her family outside Chicago, she likes to fly Southwest Airlines from Newark Liberty International Airport near her home in Maplewood, N.J.

Starting in November, she'll need to make alternate arrangements.

Last week, Southwest announced it would no longer fly to Newark. The grounding of the Boeing 737 Max after two deadly crashes in Ethiopia and Indonesia has caused the airline to cancel flights and consolidate routes into places such as Newark, which are less profitable.

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We have news this morning about the financial hit that Boeing has taken because of its 737 Max planes. The company, you might remember, had to ground those planes earlier this year after two crashes, one in Ethiopia and one in Indonesia. Three hundred and forty-six people died in those crashes. Now this morning Boeing has issued its financial results for April, May and June, and NPR's Jim Zarroli was paying attention.

Good morning, Jim.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: Good morning.

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California is home to some of the wealthiest places in the country and some of the poorest. Among them is the Imperial Valley in the hot desert country east of San Diego. The county is home to some huge rich farms growing crops such as spinach, potatoes and cauliflower. But the area also has what the Labor Department calls the highest unemployment rate in the U.S. NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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FedEx is pushing back against the Trump administration's efforts to target a Chinese telecom. The government says Huawei Technologies is a threat to national security. It added Huawei last month to a list of companies that Americans are not supposed to do business with. Well, FedEx says those rules are nearly impossible to comply with. It's suing the Commerce Department. NPR's Jim Zarroli has more.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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