military training ranges

DVIDS

Eielson Air Force Base officials say they reminded pilots and their commanders participating in a training exercise last month that they cannot harass wildlife that wanders onto military training ranges during a recent exercise. The issue came up after a pilot asked for permission to flow low over several bison to scare them away from the Donnelly Training Area near Fort Greely, where the aircraft were preparing for a live-fire training exercise.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Some 5,000 soldiers from around the country and Canada are headed back home after a grueling three-week field-training exercise on ranges around Fort Greely. Arctic Anvil was the biggest exercise U.S. Army-Alaska has held since 2001. It was intended to test the Stryker Brigade’s warfighting abilities. But it also challenged the soldiers who provide logistical support that make operations like Arctic Anvil happen.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Hundreds of Fairbanks-area residents and a platoon of elected officials turned out Tuesday to tell a delegation of Army officials why they shouldn’t reduce the number of soldiers stationed in Alaska. Many of those who spoke emphasized that Alaska has something that no other state can offer – its location.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

U.S. military experts got a chance last week to check out new Arctic-rated outdoor gear that was on display at Fort Wainwright. U.S. Army-Alaska hosted a symposium to show equipment that’s being tested as possible replacements for gear in the Army inventory. That may include such venerable standbyes as the bunny boot.


U.S. Army

One of the best moose-hunting areas in the Interior can be found on a military training range near Fort Greely. But a busy Army and Air Force training schedule is limiting hunters’ ability to get back into the area.


Alaska Railroad

State and Army officials have agreed on a procedure that will allow hunters to use the new Tanana River bridge in Salcha to get to military lands on the other side of the river. The agencies established the process in time for hunters to get access to military training areas in September.


DVIDS

Army and Air Force personnel and equipment will be out in force over the next couple of weeks throughout the Interior as they engage in two major field training exercises. Soldiers with Fort Wainwright’s Stryker brigade begin a live-fire exercise today, and the Air Force launches its next Red Flag training round Thursday.


Alaska Railroad

Alaska’s longest bridge is pretty much done. The 3,300-foot structure now spans the Tanana riverbed just west of Salcha, providing the military with year-round ground access to its training ranges on the far side. But, state officials don’t yet know where they’ll get funding to begin work on the next phase of the Northern Rail Extension project.


Alaska Railroad

*This story won Third Place for Best Reporting on Government or Politics from the Alaska Press Club in 2013.

Work on the big Alaska Railroad bridge across the Tanana River in Salcha is on track to be completed next August. But it looks like the state’s longest bridge won’t be getting much use over the next few years, because the Army doesn’t have money to build roads on the other side of the Tanana.


Alaska Railroad

Work is again under way in earnest on the state’s longest bridge, after a few weeks of down time over the holidays. The workers are hustling to complete several projects at the construction site in Salcha, and they hope to begin a new one – laying massive girders – before the ice begins to move on the Tanana River.