Missile Defense Agency

Henrick Bliddel

A delegation of politicians affiliated with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization met with researchers and officials during a stopover Thursday at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks. The NATO Parliamentary Assembly’s Science and Technology Committee came to UAF during a fact-finding visit to Alaska to learn about the university’s research on the impact of climate change in the Arctic.


KUAC file photo

Work on an $80 million structure at Fort Greely’s missile-defense base is expected to begin by midsummer. But it’ll be mostly design work; military officials say major construction on the project probably won’t get going until next summer.


Missile Defense Agency file photo

Fort Greely’s missile-defense base could get a big boost in spending this year if the U.S. Senate approves a measure worked out last week by a bipartisan group of lawmakers. The Senate this week will consider approving a federal-budget bill and National Defense Authorization Act, which calls for 80 million dollars in construction at the missile base. That’s in addition to upgrades at the base that will increase the number of interceptor missiles there from the current 26 to 40.


U.S. Army

Friday’s announcement by U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel of a buildup at the missile-defense base at Fort Greely, in response to threats by North Korea, has generated cautious enthusiasm over the prospect of an economic boost for the Interior at a time of budget cuts, furloughs and ongoing cutbacks.


Brian Webb/KCLU

The U.S. Missile Defense Agency successfully tested an anti-missile warhead over the weekend. 

The test, conducted with a missile launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., marked the first time that missiles like those based at Fort Greely have been launched in more than two years. And it sets the stage for the agency and missile-defense contractor Boeing to conduct a full-scale test later this year.