Fort Greely

Fort Wainwright

Moose-hunting season begins in just over two weeks, and hunters are up in arms over restrictions on access through military-training ranges that will make it hard for them to get back into their favorite camps. Fort Wainwright officials say they’ve tried to accommodate hunters’ concerns. But they say the restrictions are needed because the ranges around Fort Greely will be busy for the next few weeks with Air Force Red Flag training exercises.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis says the U.S. military increasingly relies on Alaska, both to provide a base of operations to maintaining dominance of the Indian and Pacific oceans to the south and to enable the Coast Guard and Navy to maintain control of U.S. Arctic waters, to the north. Mattis spoke at a news conference this morning at Eielson Air Force Base.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Despite the apparent easing of tensions on the Korean Peninsula, soldiers operating the missile-defense base at Fort Greely and elsewhere remain ready to respond to an attack by North Korea or other hostile regimes against the United States. U.S. military officials told reporters on a rare tour of the high-security facility at Greely last week that is the hub of the nation’s defense against missile attack that remains operational 24/7.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Army Corps of Engineers officials are at Fort Greely this week to begin planning in earnest for the decommissioning and possible dismantling of the old mothballed nuclear power plant on post. The staff from the Corps’ Baltimore office also are talking with officials on post and in Delta Junction about the project, which could take up to a decade to complete.


U.S. Army

Army officials have begun the years-long process of decommissioning Alaska’s first and only nuclear powerplant, located at Fort Greely. The facility was built during the height of the Cold War, then shut down in 1972 after 10 years of on-and-off operation. Much of it was dismantled and disposed, the rest encased in concrete. And now, the Army Corps of Engineers plans to remove most or perhaps all of what’s left of the plant.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

A toxic-chemical expert told a group in Fairbanks Monday that perflourinated compounds that have contaminated groundwater around some Fairbanks and Eielson Air Force Base-area neighborhoods pose a serious, long-term threat to human health. Organizers of the meeting say they hope to convince state and federal regulators to set more stringent standards for the chemical compounds.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Anthropologists with the University of Alaska Fairbanks say a site they’re excavating near the Delta River west of Fort Greely was first inhabited by people some 13,000 years ago – not long after humanity crossed over a now-submerged land bridge that connected Asia and North America. The anthropologists say that’s just one of the many discoveries they’ve made at the Delta River Overlook. And they say they’re just beginning to uncover its secrets.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Cleanup work began this month at a mothballed pump station near Delta Junction that was part of the old Haines to Fairbanks Pipeline. Crews will remove contaminated materials from the Timber Pump Station and two other sites that were part of an old Army-operated pipeline built in the 1950s to transport fuel to the Interior’s three military bases.


DVIDS

Eielson Air Force Base officials say they reminded pilots and their commanders participating in a training exercise last month that they cannot harass wildlife that wanders onto military training ranges during a recent exercise. The issue came up after a pilot asked for permission to flow low over several bison to scare them away from the Donnelly Training Area near Fort Greely, where the aircraft were preparing for a live-fire training exercise.


Fairbanks North Star Borough School District

The Delta Greely School District wants to get rid of an old, unused schoolhouse on Fort Greely. But it can’t afford to demolish the structure, and the Army and state government have turned down requests by the district to pay those costs. So district officials took their case to Congress.


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