groundwater contamination

The Fairbanks City Council approved an ordinance Monday that’s intended to help provide drinking water for property owners in an area on the city’s south side who’ve lost the use of their wells due to groundwater contamination. Mayor Jim Matherly says it’s only the first step toward addressing the mounting costs of the contamination problem.


U.S. Pacific Command

The Fairbanks City Council on Monday voted 6-0 to advance an ordinance that if approved would help city residents and businesses deal with contaminated groundwater on the city’s south side.

City of North Pole

The North Pole City Council tonight will consider awarding a contract to an engineering company to develop a plan intended to protect the community’s groundwater from contamination. The mayor says the plan is needed to ensure the city will be able to expand its municipal water system to areas where the groundwater already is contaminated.


DVIDS/Air National Guard file photo

Officials with the Air Force and other agencies are asking members of the public to weigh-in on several proposals to provide drinking water to Moose Creek residents who can’t use their wells because of groundwater contamination. The pollution came from Eielson Air Force Base’s use of firefighting foam in years past. On Monday, North Pole City Council members made it clear they believe expanding their municipal water system to Moose Creek is the best alternative.


KDLG file photo

A network of partnerships between nonprofit organizations, government agencies and private-sector recycling companies is planning to step up efforts to clean up junk and electronic waste that’s been accumulating for decades in remote communities around Alaska. The partnerships are racing to clean up as much of the stuff as possible by 2020, when federal funding for the projects is scheduled to run out.


Ground water contamination at Eielson Air Force Base has spread off the facility. As KUAC’s Dan Bross reports, a chemical thought to originate from firefighting foam used at the base prior to the year 2000, is being detected in groundwater wells in a nearby subdivision. 

KUAC file photo

A panel of experts wrapped up two days of meetings Thursday in Fairbanks that will help the state Department of Environmental Conservation determine the appropriate cleanup level for contamination of North Pole’s groundwater caused by chemicals leaking from the refinery now owned by Flint Hills Resources.


U.S. Army

Army officials have agreed to pay nearly $160,000 in fines to the Environmental Protect Agency for Fort Wainwright’s failure to manage underground storage tanks as required by a federal law designed to protect groundwater.


KUAC file photo

Officials with Flint Hills Resources Alaska announced today that they will halt processing crude oil at the company’s North Pole refinery over the next few months and shut down the facility. As KUAC’s Tim Ellis reports, company officials decided to shut down the refinery because of rising costs to run it and shrinking profit margins – and ongoing costs of cleaning up groundwater tainted by an industrial solvent that leaked from the refinery for years.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

The operator of the North Pole refinery wants to state to set a lower standard for cleaning up the sulfolane groundwater-contamination problem in the North Pole area. Flint Hills Resources Alaska has asked the head of the state Department of Environmental Conservation to set a less-stringent cleanup level for the industrial solvent that leaked into the groundwater for more than a decade before Flint Hills bought the refinery in 2004. The requests could delay cleanup for several months.


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