solar energy

Todd Paris

A volunteer neighborhood campaign has picked up more than 250 households in the Fairbanks area interested in a bulk-buy for solar installation. “Solarize Fairbanks” is helping homeowners and businesses take advantage of discounts and tax credits. The project deadline is extended until August 15 to have solar installed in 2020. The industry seems to be pandemic-proof, and the campaign has surprised even the people coordinating it.


Solarize Fairbanks Buys Solar In Bulk

Jan 3, 2020
Robyne/KUAC

A campaign to get Interior Alaska residents to think about household solar power is gaining popularity. A meeting Monday evening at the Ken Kunkel Community Center will discuss “Solarize Fairbanks”, a community campaign to reduce the costs of solar panels. 


GVEA

Golden Valley Electric Association highlighted the utility’s new solar-energy array and its other renewable-energy efforts during Thursday’s annual members meeting. Completed last fall, it’s the biggest solar farm in Alaska, designed to power 70 homes. And now that it's spring, Golden Valley will finally be able to assess its performance.


NANA

Alaska’s rural communities are increasingly looking to wind, solar and biomass to reduce their use of expensive diesel fuel to generate heat and electricity. Residents talked about their efforts to use renewable energy sources at this week’s Rural Energy Conference in Fairbanks.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

About 400 people from around Alaska and elsewhere converged on the Westmark Fairbanks Hotel and Conference Center Tuesday to talk about how residents of the state’s rural and remote communities can reduce high energy costs during the 20th Rural Energy Conference.


Ft. Yukon Goes Solar

Jun 2, 2015
David Pelunis-Messier / TCC

Ft. Yukon recently began operating a solar electric project. As KUAC’s Dan Bross reports, the system is testing integration of the energy source into the power grid of an isolated northern community. 

Tim Ellis/KUAC

*This story won Third Place for Best Environmental Reporting from the Alaska Press Club in 2013.

The Cold Climate Housing Research Center in Fairbanks moved ahead Wednesday on a project that will demonstrate how solar energy can be collected year-round and used to heat a commercial building without fossil fuels, like heating oil. The project is being funded by one of the world’s biggest fossil-fuel companies.