Army

Tim Ellis/KUAC

Hundreds of Fairbanks-area residents and a platoon of elected officials turned out Tuesday to tell a delegation of Army officials why they shouldn’t reduce the number of soldiers stationed in Alaska. Many of those who spoke emphasized that Alaska has something that no other state can offer – its location.


Dan Bross / KUAC

Fairbanks leaders are prepping to make the case for preserving local troop levels as the Army pursues a nationwide downsize.  KUAC’s Dan Bross reports.

Tim Ellis/KUAC

U.S. military experts got a chance last week to check out new Arctic-rated outdoor gear that was on display at Fort Wainwright. U.S. Army-Alaska hosted a symposium to show equipment that’s being tested as possible replacements for gear in the Army inventory. That may include such venerable standbyes as the bunny boot.


Brian Schlumbohm, Fort Wainwright public affairs

The Army’s highest-ranking soldier in Alaska says the military trains here so it can operate in the Arctic, which he calls one of the world’s most difficult environments. And Major General Mike Shields says it’s becoming more complex with climate change.


U.S. Army

One of the best moose-hunting areas in the Interior can be found on a military training range near Fort Greely. But a busy Army and Air Force training schedule is limiting hunters’ ability to get back into the area.


Alaska Railroad

State and Army officials have agreed on a procedure that will allow hunters to use the new Tanana River bridge in Salcha to get to military lands on the other side of the river. The agencies established the process in time for hunters to get access to military training areas in September.


U.S. Army

Army officials have agreed to pay nearly $160,000 in fines to the Environmental Protect Agency for Fort Wainwright’s failure to manage underground storage tanks as required by a federal law designed to protect groundwater.


Tim Ellis/KUAC

Updated: State Forestry officials said this morning that the 100-Mile Creek Fire is now 50 percent contained.

State and federal fire officials say they think they’ve got a handle on the 100-Mile Creek fire, burning mainly on military training land west of Delta Junction. But the officials say they won’t know for certain until they see how their fire lines hold up after high winds blow through the area later today.


Alaska Community Action on Toxics

Environmental officials are reviewing cleanup work that’s been done at a military test site south of Delta Junction. The Army tested chemical- and biological-warfare agents at the site during the height of the Cold War. The state and military want to round up all available information on cleanups that’ve been done at the Gerstle River Test Site and surrounding area to ensure it doesn’t pose a threat to human health.


U.S. Army

City and borough government officials here in Alaska are a bit on edge about Congress’s failure to provide funding for the PILT program, which helps local governments with a lot of federal land in their areas. The program is especially critical to smaller communities like Delta Junction.


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